Saturday, January 4, 2014

Sandwich Rye

Sandwich Rye Bread
 
-on time:25 mins.Baking time:40 mins.Total time:5 hrs 5 mins.Yield:1 loaf, 16 servings
 
ingredients Volume  Ounces  Grams
1 1/2 packets "highly active" active dry yeast; or 1 tablespoon active dry yeast; or 2 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast
2/3 cup to 7/8 cup lukewarm water*
1/4 cup vegetable oil
3/4 cup dill pickle juice
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons caraway seeds
1 1/4 teaspoons dill seeds
1 tablespoon yellow mustard seeds OR 1 tablespoon prepared Dijon mustard
3/4 cup instant mashed potato flakes
2 1/2 cups King Arthur Unbleached Bread Flour
1 1/3 cups pumpernickel
 
*Use the lesser amount in summer (or in a humid environment), the greater amount in winter (or in a dry climate), and somewhere in between the rest of the year, or if your house is climate controlled.
directions
 
1) Dissolve the yeast in 2 tablespoons of the lukewarm water with a pinch of sugar. Allow it to rest for 15 minutes, till it becomes puffy. If you're using instant yeast, you can skip this step.
 
2) Combine the dissolved yeast (or instant yeast) with the remaining ingredients, and mix till clumps form; the dough may seem dry at this point. Let it rest for 20 minutes, for the flour to start to absorb the liquid.
 
3) Knead the dough—by mixer or bread machine set on the dough cycle—to make a stiff, but fairly smooth dough. It'll take about 7 minutes in a stand mixer at second speed, using the dough hook. The dough should clean the sides of the bowl; if it doesn't sprinkle in a bit more all-purpose flour. We don't recommend kneading this dough by hand, as it's hard to develop the gluten sufficiently. If you DO knead by hand, realize that the dough will take longer to rise, and won't rise as high.
 
4) Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl, cover the bowl, and let the dough rise till it's puffy, about 1 to 2 hours. It may or may not have doubled in bulk, but it definitely will have expanded.
 
5) Gently deflate the dough, and shape it into a log. Place the log in a lightly greased 8 1/2" x 4 1/2" loaf pan (for a stiffer dough), or 9" x 5" loaf pan (for a slacker dough). Press it to the edges of the pan, and flatten the top.
 
6) Tent the pan with greased plastic wrap, and allow the loaf to rise till it's crowned about 1" to 1 1/2" over the edge of the pan, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 350°F.
 
7) Bake the bread for 20 minutes. Tent it lightly with foil, and bake for an additional 20 minutes. When done the bread will be golden brown, and its internal temperature will register 190°F on an instant-read thermometer.
 
8) Remove the bread from the oven, wait 5 minutes, remove it from the pan, and allow it to cool completely on a rack before slicing. Store for up to a week at cool room temperature.

© 2014 King Arthur Flour Company, Inc. All rights reserved.

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Chicken and Biscuit Bake

I got this recipe off of FB and it looked really interesting and not to hard.
There were several comments on how good it is. I am wondering about cutting it in half will have to study the recipe a little more to decided on that one.
 
 Chicken and Biscuit Bake is, basically, a cross between chicken and dumplings and a pot pie. In any case, it's fabulously good and comes together in a convenient casserole!
3 cups (approx.) of cooked, shredded chicken (I used 2 breasts for this)
1 1/2 cups chicken stock or broth
1/4 cup (half of a stick) butter, melted
2 cups Bisquick
1 1/2 cups milk
1 can cream of chicken soup
1 1/2 cups frozen mixed veggies (allow to thaw for about 30 minutes before adding to recipe)
3 chicken bouillon cubes
Pepper
 
Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Warm chicken stock in a small sauce pan and add in the bouillon cubes to dissolve. Keep warm until ready to use. Lightly coat with non-stick spray a 9 x 13 casserole dish or large, round casserole dish (mine was a 12" round). Pour in the melted butter. Layer the shredded chicken on top of the butter. Sprinkle on the veggies.
 
 In a small mixing bowl, combine the milk and Bisquick. (It's okay if there are a few lumps remaining.) Pour over the chicken and vegetables. DO NOT MIX! Sprinkle on a little black pepper, if desired. Combine the cream of chicken soup with the warmed stock in a small mixing bowl. Once blended, slowly pour over the Bisquick layer.
 
Again, DO NOT MIX! (Yes, it'll looks like a big, soupy mess. Trust me ... this is what it's supposed to look like!) If using a 9 x 13 pan, bake for 40 - 45 minutes or until casserole is set and top is brown and bubbly. If using a large, round dish (mine was 12"), bake for 50 - 55 minutes or until casserole is set and top is brown and bubbly. Remove from oven and allow to rest for 5 minutes. Serve and enjoy!
 
So then I decided to go check out the Bisquick web site and found another interesting recipe
 
Well I seem to be doing more recipes on this blog then quilting but that ok too I guess. :)

Monday, November 11, 2013

Apple carmel pie

Easy Skillet Apple Pie
Makes 8 servings

2 pounds Granny Smith apples
2 pounds Gala apples
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar (divided)
½ cup (1 stick) butter
1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
1 package (14.1 ounces) refrigerated piecrust or one double homemade piecrust
1 egg white, whisked until foamy
Vanilla ice cream
Whipped cream
 
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Peel apples and cut into ½-inch-thick wedges. Toss apples with cinnamon and ¾ cup granulated sugar.
Melt butter in a 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat; add brown sugar and cook, stirring constantly, 1 to 2 minutes or until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and place 1 piecrust in skillet over brown sugar mixture. Spoon apple mixture over piecrust and top with remaining piecrust. Brush top of piecrust with egg white; sprinkle with remaining 2 tablespoons sugar. Cut 4 or 5 slits in top for steam to escape.
Bake in preheated oven 1 hour to 1 hour and 10 minutes or until golden brown and bubbly, shielding with aluminum foil during last 10 minutes to prevent excessive browning, if necessary. Cool on a wire rack 30 minutes before serving. Serve with vanilla ice cream and whipped cream.
 So far so good

Saturday, September 14, 2013

Kidney Stones

End of Aug and first week or so of Sept has been quite the adventure. I ended up in ER on 25th for Kidney stones and got some pain medications and a MRI to see what was going on. The stones were quite large and the ER Dr was not sure if it would pass or not.

So Monday was not to bad and I went to work but Tue things were starting to fire up again so I called and made an appointment with a urologist. The first day I could get in was Wed morning early as the hospital is a 2 hour drive hubby and I were up early and made the trip. Saw the Dr. and he looks at the MRI and says you need surgery. I can see about scheduling you for today or we can set this up later in the week. Well we were there and had the time so I had surgery and they tried to break up the stones using sound waves.

Well that did not work as planned the stone would not break up so after 2 weeks and a follow up appointment I had laser surgery last Thursday and they were able to break up the stone and capture part of it. So now I will hopefully find out why I am making the stones I hope.

I am so ready for this to be done and figure out what is going on so that maybe I will not end up with more stones. We can only hope.

It been a long couple weeks.

Thursday, June 6, 2013

A flour/glutten free recipe and another recipe that sure sounds good

I found this recipe for a

gluten-free chocolate financiers

They use Almond flour and Cocoa and bake in  mini muffin tins. Definitely interested in giving this one a try.

SMORES CUPS:
 7 whole graham crackers, finely crushed
 1/4 cup powdered sugar
 6 tbsp butter, melted
 4 bars milk chocolate candy
12 large marshmallows

You are going to be shocked how easy these are.
Step 1:
Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Place graham crackers into a large reseal able plastic bag. Finely crush into crumbs using Baker’s Roller®;. Combine graham cracker crumbs, powdered sugar and butter in Small Batter Bowl

Step 2:
Using Small Scoop, place scant scoop of crumb mixture in each cup of a Mini-Muffin Pan. Press crumbs to form shallow cups with Mini-Tart Shaper. Bake 4-5 minutes or until edges are bubbling

Step 3:
While the crust is in the oven, break two of the candy bars into rectangles. Remove pan from oven; place one rectangle into each cup.

Step 4:
Cut marshmallows in half crosswise using shears dipped in cold water. Place one marshmallow half, cut-side down, into each cup. Return to oven 1-2 minutes or until marshmallows are just slightly softened. Remove from oven to a cooling rack; cool 15 minutes. Carefully remove cups from pan. Cool completely.

Step 5:
Break remaining candy bars and place in (1-cup/250 mL) Prep Bowl. Microwave on HIGH 1 minute-1 1/2 minutes or until melted and smooth, stirring every 20 seconds. Dip the top of each marshmallow in melted chocolate. Turn top-side up and let stand 40 minutes-1 hour or until set.

Yield: 24 cups
Store the cups in a single layer in an airtight container for up to 1 week. Freezing is not recommended. For a richer chocolate flavor, substitute dark chocolate candy bars for the milk chocolate.

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Rye Bread

 
New York Deli Rye Bread
Adapted from The Bread Bible
I have trimmed Beranbaum’s directions significantly. The thing is, she gives great and extensively detailed directions, but my thing is, I like to pare things down a little bit, especially when it comes to bread. I honestly believe that once you are certain your yeast is working, it’s harder to mess up a loaf of bread than it is to make it delicious. Follow the rising times and size pointers, see that it’s kneaded well and baked at the right temperature and you can have a little bit of New York City in your kitchen without a lot less dingy gray snow and loud sirens.Set aside 8 hours for this. Yes, eight. You’ll only need to be hands-on for about 30 minutes of it, and you’re welcome to run errands in the rising intervals, but you need to be able to check in every hour or two. It’s worth it, promise.
Makes one 1 3/4-pound round loaf

Sponge
3/4 cup (4 ounces, 117 grams) bread flour
3/4 cup (3.3 ounces, 95 grams) rye flour
1/2 teaspoon (1.6 grams) instant yeast
1 1/2 tablespoons (0.6 ounces, 18.7 grams) sugar
1/2 tablespoon (4.6 grams) malt powder (or barley malt syrup or honey (10.5 grams), or sugar (6.2 grams)
1 1/2 cups (12.5 ounces, 354 grams) water, at room temperature
 
Flour Mixture
2 1/4 cups (12.5 ounces, 351 grams) bread flour
1/2 plus 1/8 teaspoon (2 grams) instant yeast
2 tablespoons (0.5 ounces, 14 grams) caraway seeds (you can grind these if you want to avoid the crunch)
1/2 tablespoon (0.3 ounces, 10.5 grams) coarse salt
 
Dough and Baking
1/2 tablespoon (0.25 ounces, 6.7 grams) vegetable oil about
 2 teaspoons (about 0.5 ounces, 16 grams) cornmeal for sprinkling
 
Make the sponge: Combine sponge ingredients in a large or mixer bowl and whisk until very smooth, to intentionally incorporate air — this will yield a thick batter. Set it aside.Make the flour mixture and cover the sponge: In a separate large bowl, whisk together the flour mixture and gently scoop it over the sponge to cover it completely. Cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap and allow it to ferment for 1 to 4 hours at room temperature.
 (The sponge will bubble through the flour mixture in places.)Mix the dough [Either with a mixer] Add the oil and mix with the dough hook on low speed for about 1 minute, until the flour is moistened enough to form a rough dough. then raise the speed to medium and mix it for 10 minutes. The dough should be very smooth and elastic, and it should jump back when pressed with a fingertip; if it is sticky, turn it out on a counter and knead in a little extra flour.[Or by hand] Add the oil and, with a wooden spoon or your hand, stir until the flour is moistened.
 
Knead the dough in the bowl until it comes together, then scrape it onto a very lightly floured counter. Knead the dough for 5 minutes, after which it might be a little sticky. Cover it with the inverted bowl and allow it to rest for 20 minutes. (Resting the dough makes it less sticky and magically easier to work with. Trust me.) Knead the dough for another 5 to 10 minutes or until it is very smooth and elastic and your upper arms are strapless gown-ready.Let the dough rise: Place the dough in a large container or bowl, lightly oiled. Oil the top of the dough as well. Allow the dough to rise until doubled, 1 1/2 to 2 hours.
 
Flip the bowl over and let the dough fall out on to a lightly floured counter, press it down gently, fold or form it back into a square-ish ball and allow it to rise a second time, back in the (re-oiled) bowl covered with plastic wrap for about 45 minutes.Shape it and wait out the final rise: Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured counter and gently press it down again. Round it into a ball and set it on a cornmeal sprinkled baking sheet.
 
 Cover it with oiled plastic wrap and let it rise until almost doubled, about 1 hour to 1 hour 15 minutes. [Skim ahead to preheating your oven, which you should do soon.] When it is gently press with a fingertip, the depression will very slowly fill in.
 
Preheat the oven: Preheat the oven to 450°F as early as you can tolerate. (Beranbaum suggests an hour, I do 30 minutes but I know others don’t like to feel like they’re wasting heat. But, you want your oven blazing hot to get the best crust.)
 
 On a shelf at the lowest level, place a baking sheet or bread stone. [If you want to get fancy and bread-oven like: Place a cast-iron skillet or sheet pan on the floor of the oven to preheat.]Slash and bake the bread: With a sharp knife or singled-edged razor blade, make 1/4- to 1/2-inch-deep slashes in the top of the dough. Mist the dough with water and quickly but gently set the baking sheet on the hot stone or hot baking sheet. [If you've decided to get fancy and bread oven-like:
 
 Toss 1/2 cup of ice cubes into the pan beneath and immediately shut the door.] Bake for 15 minutes, lower the temperature to 400°F and continue baking for 30 to 40 minutes or until the bread is golden brown and a skewer inserted into the middle comes out clean (or a thermometer inserted into the center reads 190°F; I prefer this method because you’ve done much too much work to possibly end up with an under- or over-baked loaf of bread).Cool the bread on a wire rack.